Primary method questions

So I started trying the primary method for the Johannah I’m working on and have a question I can’t seem to find the answers for on here: Do you bake every round? As in after every blue, red & yellow wash? That’s what I’ve been doing so far (I’ve only done two rounds) And approximately how many rounds does it take before it starts getting to an ethnic/AA tone?

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I tried the primary method once and I didn’t bake between colors, just let them dry. I personally hated it, it took too long and I gave up. I know others really like this method but I can’t do it myself. Good luck!

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I do all three of the primary colors, then bake.

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I should specify what I mean by every round- I mean do you bake after every trio of colors. As in you do blue-let it dry, red-let it dry, yellow- let it try and then bake. Or can you do two of those trios and then bake? I’m not sure how to explain it lol

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I would do after every 3 layers (red-blue-yellow). That’s the most I ever do before baking, don’t know if it affects anything or not though.

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I usually bake between every trio - more than that, and I think you risk too much streaky-ness. It takes me about 15 or so trios before I start to see an AA tone deep enough that I’m personally happy with!

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Another thing you could try is using a “mother color,” which means mixing the primaries together to get a skintone (brown). Might help you get there a bit faster. Use the spyglass for mother color and see if it is something you’d like to try… sorry if we are throwing too much at you at one time…

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That helps for a frame of reference thanks!

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Yeah I might try that halfway through if it starts taking forever

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Which means 45 layers?

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I’ll do one trio, then bake. Using primary colors to make other colors is a very good way to come up with different colors for your own personal touch. However, it is not considered the primary method. The primary method needs to be painted layer by layer so the colors show through each other creating varied skin tone giving a more realistic look.

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Yes, I highly recommend this link, by the one who taught it Thanks, Yelena, I could not remember her name! As far as the rounds, and such. there are no flesh colors used in the primary method. Only red, blue and yellow. AND, yes, it takes a LOT, a LOT of layers. Very thin layers, and it takes so long before you get anywhere with it. A lot of people do it and love it. I did and I thought it was OK, but I did get really bored with doing the rounds of color. If you are not a very, very patient person, and you really like to use more colors, I don’t think the Primary Method is for you. (Not you, Shawn, just “you” in general.)

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Wow, yes, I guess it does!! That sounds like a lot of work when said that way :rofl:

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It was very boring for me also, so I stick to what I like - flesh layers. :slight_smile:

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I bake after every trio. (3-5 sets for Caucasian) I start out using the trio but after a 5-8 sets of the primaries , for AA tones, I like to use more mother color ( it seems to get to the color I want quicker).I do bake in between each mother color. I use Burnt umber also once in awhile. I don’t use baby skin or flesh.

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