Mohair alternatives?

So, I recently was working with some of the mohair I have and really noticed my allergy to mohair has gotten significantly worse within atleast the last several months, what are some alternatives that would work for a newborn? I’m leaning towards trying alpaca as we have a farm nearby that produces it but was curious of options?

I have been rooting with alpaca and it is much softer. It’s a little more fragile. But I don’t have allergies to mohair at all, and alpaca leaves my entire face itchy the whole time I work with it.

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I’ve tried alpaca and it’s soooo hard to work with. Super fine and flyaway. I spent two nights rooting a head with it and i didn’t make hardly any progress it kept falling out! I also tried using it as peach fuzz and it all fell out :tired_face:

Maybe human hair would work?

I wouldn’t try synthetic been there done that! So slippery the rooting needles couldn’t even grip it

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The mohair I’m used to working with is incredibly fine so I’m hoping alpaca wouldn’t be too different just hoping for no allergic reaction! I’ve thought about going the human hair route and might honestly has to consider it!

Maybe get a tiny bit of alpaca first to make sure you’re not allergic. Other than that you can try human hair or maybe even paint hair.

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I can’t paint hair to save my life, I’m definitely going to se did if I can get a teeny bit of alpaca as the farm is less than a mile away!

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Alpaca works really well for tiny babies as it will lay flat and its silky soft. It can be a learning curve to root if you have been using adult mohair but if you have been using kid or yearling its a bit like that. I think human hair works really well for larger babies. I have recently bought Russian human hair and its a lot softer and easier to work with than the more coarse asian hair I used on my Gabriela.

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I’ve always used alpaca, I love it and find it easy to work with, that being said though I should say that I learned with alpaca so had nothing to compare it to and it took a while for me to get decent at rooting. I’m not sure if it was because of the alpaca or just getting the hang of rooting in general. I find it to be very soft and quite strong, as long as I’m using quality needles and root at an angle. When I’ve used cheap needles off ebay, ($1 for like 60 needles) I found that they cut the hairs as I rooted them. And if I root straight up and down the hair has a tendency to slip out for me. I mostly use 40-42g spiral needles now and have pretty much no breakage or slippage. A lot of etsy sellers have great quality alpaca for under $10 for 1/4-1 ounce so it’s pretty inexpensive to try it.

  • I forgot to add with the spiral needles they can pick up a lot of hair so for micro-rooting it’s important to just pull aside the number of hairs you want to root before inserting the needle
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Hi Emma. Stupid question here :(((, but was is spiral needles and where can I purchase them. I have lots of alpaca hair and I’m thinking maybe those needles can help. Thanks

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